March 28th, 2011

Amazon Service Lets You Store Your Music In The Clouds

Amazon Service Lets You Store Your Music In The Clouds

Via — Edward C. Baig, USA TODAY
“The outlook for music retailers not named Apple has been cloudy at best. Amazon.com hopes to brighten the forecast today with the introduction of new digital services the online retail giant hopes will bolster market share it concedes is “insignificant” compared with Apple.

Amazon launches Amazon Cloud Drive, an external hard drive in the sky you can use to store music — or for that matter, pictures, videos and documents — that you can access from any Web browser on a computer. Amazon claims it is secure.
Amazon Service Lets You Store Your Music In The Clouds



March 15th, 2011

Music Supervisor Profile :: Gary Calamar

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Gary Calamar hails from the Bronx, NY, and grew up a constant presence in local record stores. When he moved to LA in the early 80s, he got himself behind the counter, managing stores and nourishing the flourishing culture of the record store. In April 2010, he released the book “Record Store Days,” inspired by both his life and tastes as a consumer and connoisseur of vinyl.

Calamar is of course much more than a consumer and author. A KCRW volunteer and DJ since the mid ‘90s, Gary hosts a Sunday night show (9p-12m) on the station that not only showcases emerging music, but looks deeply into the roots of Rock, Country, Jazz, Blues, and Soul.

In 1998, Calamar got his break into the world of music supervision, placing music with Marq Roswell for the movie, Slums of Beverly Hills and in 1999, again with Roswell, for Varsity Blues; this latter soundtrack earned him a gold record. His work with partner Thomas Golubic on Six Feet Under (HBO) became strongly influential, making a case for placing indie music in television. Gary went on to found Go Music with Alyson Vidoli. He currently places music on True Blood (HBO), House (Fox), and Dexter (Showtime), and was recently nominated for a Grammy for the True Blood II Soundtrack.

In all aspects of the music business, Gary Calamar’s focus is broad and considerate; he remains abreast of all new movements and grounded in the history that makes them compelling, meaningful, and fun.
Music Supervisor Profile :: Gary Calamar



February 11th, 2011

Music Supervisor Profile :: Scott Vener

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Most music supervisors pay their dues working for record labels or publishing companies, or interning for established supervisors. It also doesn’t hurt to work for KCRW. Although he did work previously as an exec at MTV in New York, Scott Vener skipped most of the conventional rungs of the ladder and landed a job without any previous experience as a supervisor on Entourage, one of coolest shows on television. Scott’s music selections play a major role in the success of the program, especially his unique skill for finding the perfect song for the end credits of each episode.

One of the most exciting things about the music that airs on Entourage is that Scott consistently breaks tracks before they’re released anywhere else. That’s included Tame Impala’s “Half Full Glass Of Wine”, Jamie T’s “Salvador”, Gnarls Barkley’s “Gone Daddy Gone” and many other mainstream songs that have gone on to become very big. An LA native, Scott Vener (aka Broke Mogul) is now the music supervisor on How to Make it in America and on Beverly Hills 90210. He’s the first to admit that he’s got a great job and a great life.
Music Supervisor Profile :: Scott Vener



February 4th, 2011

Rdio :: Raises $17.5 Million

Rdio :: Raises $17.5 Million
[Via-Vator]

Rdio, a music subscription service for the United States and Canada, announced Thursday that it has raised a $17.5 million round of financing from new investor Mangrove Capital Partners with participation from existing investors Janus Friis (Rdio co-founder), Atomico and Skype.

Warner Bros. Records Chairman Rob Cavallo has joined Rdio’s board, which already included Mark Dyne (CEO of Europlay Capital Advisors), co-founders Janus Friis and Niklas Zennstrom (the original founders of Skype), and CEO Drew Larner.

Despite what the name might suggest, Rdio is not another Internet radio service like Pandora or Last.fm, where you can’t choose exactly what you want to hear. On Rdio, users pay a monthly subscription fee ($5 for basic or $10 for premium) to gain complete, on-demand access to the service’s library of 100 percent licensed music. All four major labels are on board: EMI Music, Sony Music Entertainment, Universal Music Group and Warner Music Group. (Continue Reading)



January 28th, 2011

Digital Music News :: Is This Working?

Digital Music News :: Is This Working?

[Via - DMN]
Is this strategy screaming for change? We just took a look at the top 100 singles on the iTunes Store (for Friday afternoon), and found that 95 of them were priced at $1.29. The remaining 5 were $0.99, and none were $0.69. Meanwhile, paid downloads are flattening (up just 1% in the US in 2010 last year according to Nielsen Soundscan).

So what happens when you expand the list? Apple actually posts the top 200 singles, so we expanded the count. But even among the top 200, 93.5 percent were $1.29, with just one 69-cent track available.

Thom

This is all part of a hard-fought victory by the majors, who wrestled with Apple for years to achieve ‘variable pricing.’ But this obviously isn’t working, and the trajectory suggests that iTunes singles will decline in 2011. “The price increase probably couldn’t have come at a worse time,” Warner Music Group chairman Edgar Bronfman, Jr. even admitted during a financial review at about this time last year. That implementation happened in 2008, or as Bronfman noted, in “the teeth of the worst recession since the Depression.”

So, why not change the pricing strategy, and save this format? The idea as initially proposed was to hike the price on more popular tracks, while matching lower pricing tiers with catalog songs. Sounds reasonable enough, though it looks that even this game plan has changed. Sources to Digital Music News recently noted that EMI has decided to price everything at $1.29 – new, old, whatever. We called EMI about this, and they declined to answer the question, though an initial examination validates the claims.

The results of our deeper dive are ahead. (Continue Reading)



January 28th, 2011

Spotify Close To A Deal With EMI

Spotify Close To A Deal With EMI

[Via - Ben Sisario - NYT]
Spotify, a digital music service that has been popular in Europe but met roadblocks in its plans to enter the American market, is inching closer to its goal. A week after it signed an arrangement with Sony Music Entertainment for distribution in the United States, the company is very close to closing a deal with EMI Music, according to a person with knowledge of the negotiations but was not authorized to discuss them.

If a contract is signed, as is expected soon, it would give Spotify a strong beachhead in America, with two of the four major labels on board. But a deal with Universal Music Group, the largest of the labels, has been elusive, and people with knowledge of those talks say that no agreement is imminent. Universal has about a 31 percent market share of music sales in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan; Sony and EMI combined have about 37 percent. (Continue Reading)



January 3rd, 2011

Music Supervisor Profile :: Thomas Golubic

Music Supervisor Profile :: Thomas Golubic

We are excited to announce a new monthly feature on Rollo & Grady in which we interview the biggest and brightest music supervisors in the film and television business.

This month we spoke with Thomas Golubic, supervisor for The Walking Dead, Rubicon, and my personal favorite: Breaking Bad. Golubic, along with his business partner at the time, Gary Calamar (True Blood), revolutionized the use of indie music in television through his and Calamar’s work on the HBO drama, Six Feet Under. The duo, both DJs at KCRW, placed songs on the show by Thievery Corporation, Wilco, Quantic, Ryan Adams, PJ Harvey, Bob Mould, and Interpol, to name a few.
Music Supervisor Profile :: Thomas Golubic
Thomas next parlayed his talents to work on one of the most exciting dramas on television: Breaking Bad. He continued his streak of quality placements using TV On The Radio, Timber Timbre, Beastie Boys, The Walkmen, Gnarls Barkley, Calexico, and Darondo.

During our conversation, Thomas spoke openly about the challenges music supervisors face today. He also offered excellent advice on how to break into the business. Lastly, he discussed the importance of music blogs and the Hype Machine as key resources for finding new music.
Music Supervisor Profile :: Thomas Golubic



December 16th, 2010

ROLLO GRADY PRODUCTIONS :: MUSIC SUPERVISION AND LICENSING SERVICES

ROLLO GRADY PRODUCTIONS :: MUSIC SUPERVISION AND LICENSING SERVICES

Thank you for visiting Rollo & Grady. We’re an online music publication and music supervision, licensing, management, and production company based in Los Angeles. Our goal is to provide a convenient and efficient way to discover and rediscover quality music. We’re excited to share the music that we listen to. At Rollo & Grady, you’ll find tracks from the past, the present, and everywhere in between, as well as local and national music news, reviews, music videos, and interviews.

Rollo & Grady Productions focuses on placing up-and-coming indie artists in film, television, commercials, and the internet. We’ve served as music consultants for both film and television, working with Mike Barker, Matt Weitzman, and Seth Macfarlane on Season 5, 6, and currently on season 7 of the Fox program American Dad and with Fox Searchlight on the film Cedar Rapids, starring Ed Helms and John C. Reilly, directed by Miguel Arteta (Youth In Revolt, The Good Girl) and produced by Jim Burke and Alexander Payne (Election, Sideways). Rollo & Grady have recently been hired to consult for the war film, Love And Honor, starring Liam Hemsworth and Teresa Palmer.

Rollo & Grady Productions

In addition to consulting, Rollo & Grady Productions handled music supervision duties on the documentary Sing, a film about the 2008 Hotel Cafe tour and the indie comedy, Last Call starring Christopher Lloyd and Tom Arnold, executive produced by David Dobkin (Wedding Crashers).

We currently supervise music on Cessna Aircraft’s online commercials for the Mandala Agency and consulting on a Toyota commercial for the Intermark Group.

Rollo & Grady has been featured or linked in the following online publications:

Los Angeles Times, Wired Magazine, The Guardian (UK), New York Times Magazine, Under The Radar Magazine, MTV, NME, Paste, Rolling Stone, Hipster Runoff, Filter, LAist, Village Voice, Current TV, Daily Swarm, Relix Magazine, USA Today, The Daily Chord, Flavorwire, JamBase, Dallas Observer, KXLU 88.9 FM, WXPN.com, Hypebot, and Seth Godin’s Blog.

ROLLO GRADY PRODUCTIONS :: MUSIC SUPERVISION AND LICENSING SERVICES

You can catch Rollo & Grady from time to time DJ’ing on LA radio station KXLU 88.9 FM.

If you are a filmmaker looking for a music supervisor, or an artist looking for song placement in film and television please contact us at rollogradyproductions@gmail.com.

Follow Rollo & Grady on Twitter (Click Here)



December 4th, 2010

Music Industry Needs To Tune Into Blogosphere

Music Industry Needs To Tune Into Blogosphere

[VIA - Mike Osegueda - Fresno Bee]

I don’t discover new music and new artists on the radio or on TV. Hardly ever do I find them in magazines or from iTunes. Most of my new music discoveries come courtesy of music blogs. The music blogosphere has become what radio used to be — a place for fans to hear music from new or emerging artists. Nah Right, Stereogum and Pigeons & Planes (a personal fave) are among the taste-making sites that often vault the careers of new music stars. But last week, something troubling happened. As part of a crackdown titled “Operation in Our Sites,” U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Homeland Security seized a number of Web domains that were selling counterfeit purses or DVDs.

Music Industry Needs To Tune Into Blogosphere

But a few were music blogs that mainly push artists and albums via free music downloads — songs that are often sent out by record labels and artists for free. One blog in particular, OnSmash.com, was a popular hub for hip-hop songs and videos. Of local note: One of its bloggers is Fresno State student Mark Iraheta (aka Legend). Make no mistake, the sites that operate on the up and up, like OnSmash, are very much helpful to record labels. They’re not “stealing music”; they’re promoting what the artists and labels send out.

Yet, in a head-scratching move, The Recording Industry Association of America, the music industry’s trade group, applauded the crackdown. It sounds like a case of the legal arm of the record industry not knowing how the promotional arm is operating.

As we all know, the relationship between the music business and the Web has been rocky for a long time. When Napster came along, labels clamored in fear as piracy ran wild. Eventually, Apple came with a new age business model and gave us a compromise — iTunes. Eventually, thousands of music blogs hit the Net, each varying in size and scope (Continue Reading)



November 15th, 2010

CrunchGear :: Will Apple Kill The MP3 Tomorrow?

CrunchGear :: Will Apple Kill The MP3 Tomorrow?

Via – Nicholas Deleon / CrunchGear

“Apple has posted a cryptic message on its Web site, teasing the world about an “exciting” iTunes announcement that’s coming tomorrow. What could it be? I saw that someone had suggested The Beatles were finally coming to iTunes, but really, who cares? If you want The Beatles on your iPhone you can grab the newly remastered albums that came out last year, “rip, mix, burn,” then off you go. Not very exciting, no. What could be exciting, though, is a streaming music service. In an instant, Apple would have killed the MP3 once and for all. You hear that? That’s the sound of the RIAA thanking Apple over and over again.

A streaming music service would make all kinds of sense for Apple, and it wouldn’t be too bad for us consumers either. Streaming services have already seen much success, chiefly with Spotify in Europe and Rdio here in the U.S. But an iTunes Streaming service, probably given a slick name like “iTunes Stream,” would instantly take the idea of streaming from something only techie geeks care about to something the whole family can enjoy.

Think about it. Every song ever (deals with record labels permitting, of course), right there on your iPhone, your iPad, your Apple TV, your MacBook, on-demand and always at the ready. If you can access the Internet (“the Cloud”), then you can listen to your tunes.

And just like that, your MP3s are worthless. Why would you maintain a giant collection of hard drive-eating MP3 and AAC (the file format iTunes uses) files when you can access the same songs from a handy App?

Let’s see… gigabytes upon gigabytes of music files versus a single App that can stream any song with the touch of a button. Well, the touch of a screen, as it were.

It’s a no-brainer, and everybody wins.” Continue Reading



November 4th, 2010

Hypebot :: The Limits Of Delocalized Music Culture

Hypebot :: The Limits Of Delocalized Music Culture

[Via - Kyle Bylin / Hypebot]

“Logic says that if people can get something for nothing, they will. Every day, millions of fans download music and don’t pay for it. Critics are quick to regard this as stealing. Fans are taking songs—without the permission of artists—and doing so without compensating them for their creativity. The primary victims of this act are major label artists. The most heavily marketed of them all. Then, since their sales are lowered, fewer up-and-coming artists get a shot at fame. The highest selling artists pay for the development of new talent. As sales decline, there’re not enough additional funds to warrant additional signings. Thus, labels take less financial risks on less music.

To many, this is a matter of morality. They argue that fans have no ethics, a sense of right and wrong. That if we continue to let this behavior occur that not only they slowly deteriorate the music that they love, but that they will move onto other crimes, such as walking into stores and stealing or other kinds of property theft. They think—that if left unchecked—a generation of criminals will emerge.

Lately, I’ve entertained a different view.
Hypebot :: The Limits Of Delocalized Music Culture