November 11th, 2008

R&G Interview // Zach Ernst Of Black Joe Lewis

R&G Interview // Zach Ernst Of Black Joe Lewis
Zach Ernst @ Austin City Limits Festival 2008 (Photo Rollo & Grady)

There would be no Black Joe Lewis and The Honey Bears without guitarist Zach Ernst. Joe was frustrated, ready to quit music and even thinking about moving to another city. Zach was a huge fan of Joe’s and told him that he could put a band together if he was willing to give it another try. And, the rest is history.

I recently caught up with Zach on the phone in Pittsburgh while the band was touring with Okkervil River.

RG: When did you first meet Joe?

Zach: I was booking the 40 Acres Fest with Little Richard at UT [University of Texas] and we needed an opening act. I had heard his record and read about him, so I tracked him down and got him to do the show for us. There were probably four thousand people there.

RG: What was the name of Joe’s band at that time?

Zach: His band was named Cool Breeze. It was sort of a rotating cast of characters. It was never really a set band. It was just Joe and then whoever else was playing with him that week. He got started doing weekly gigs at the Hole in the Wall, but I never got to see him there because I was too young to get in. You had to be 21. But, Bill, our bass player, would go to the Hole in the Wall and watch Joe play from the outside – there was a window where you could see what was going on onstage from the street.

RG: When did you change the name of the band to Black Joe Lewis and The Honey Bears?

Zach: The first gig we played together we were still the Cool Breeze Band. Between the time Joe did the Little Richard show with his other group and we did our first gig about a month passed, and Joe was gigging with the Weary Boys – they were a bluegrass band from Austin serving as Cool Breeze. Joe was offered a gig at the Parish, which is a club down there. He didn’t really have a band because he wasn’t playing with the same group of guys all the time. I think he was considering hanging up the music thing. So I said to Joe, “Well, hey, I know these guys, I’ll get a horn section together, I can get a new rhythm section together and we’ll just learn your first record.”

RG: How’s the tour going so far?

Zach: It’s going pretty good, man. We’re actually in Pittsburgh and we have the day off today. We did a fly-out to do a wedding in Santa Barbara, then played in Pittsburgh Thursday, and we’re driving to Chicago tonight. We did the first leg of the tour with Okkervil River. We’ve been doing some big shows. We’re doing a couple more weeks of our own shows and playing CMJ. The reception’s been pretty good, man. This is the first tour we’ve done that’s more than a couple of weeks, so it’s a big step.

RG: Describe the band’s sound?

Zach: Well, Joe came up with “garage soul” and we all liked that. We draw from influences like James Brown and Howlin’ Wolf, and also from ‘70s punk rock, garage rock, the Sonics and the Monks. We’re definitely influenced by all the great, older blues and rock-and-roll artists. Joe plays a really unique style of guitar, like an aggressive lead guitar. Having two loud guitars in the band isn’t really something that any of those soul bands we love so much really ever did. We’re still young, and I can definitely tell that the longer we stay out the more we’re developing and getting better at playing with each other.

Black Joe Lewis and The Honey Bears Tour Dates (Click Here)

Download:
MP3: Black Joe Lewis and The Honey Bears – Gunpowder
MP3: Black Joe Lewis and The Honey Bears – Jungle

Download:
Black Joe Lewis – Black Joe Lewis (iTunes)
Black Joe Lewis – Black Joe Lewis and the Honey Bears (iTunes)



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October 20th, 2008

Geoff Hanson :: Scrapple

Geoff Hanson :: Scrapple

“Scrapple” features what I think is one of the greatest soundtracks ever produced. In their directorial debut, brothers Chris and Geoff Hanson scored a major break when they landed veteran blues legend Taj Mahal, who produced the soundtrack, rerecorded versions of his favorite songs and added some originals. The soundtrack is really the underlying narrative of the movie and also features JJ Cale, John Martyn, Cymande and Widespread Panic.

“Scrapple” follows a summer in the life of ski bums in the fictional town of Ajax, Colorado in the late ’70’s. Geoff Hanson stars as the low-level drug dealer Al Dean. Another star was a pig called Scrapple, named after the pork delicacy, which led The New York Times to coin the film “Babe on Acid.” Geoff and Chris also directed and produced “The Earth Will Swallow You”, which documents the summer 2000 tour of Widespread Panic.

R&G: Congratulations on the ten-year anniversary of “Scrapple.” How much do you think the soundtrack contributed to the longevity of the film?

Geoff: We hear all the time from people it’s the best soundtrack they’ve ever heard. I think the movie kind of circulates as much as a CD, and I think a lot of people come to the movie for the music. We’re just happy that people still watch it ten years later.

R&G: Keller Williams recently recorded a song called “Nepalese Temple Balls” based on a scene from the movie. How did that come about?

Geoff: The lyrics from the song are pulled from the movie pretty much verbatim. It’s the scene in the movie where Al Dean, the character I play, tells his friends about this drug, this thing that he’s got coming in. It starts off, “If you like this stuff, you’re not going to believe what I got coming in”. They are these Nepalese Temple Balls, these crazy things from the shadows of Mount Everest made by monks.

In 2007, I was DJ’ing at a radio station in Wilmington called 106.7. The Penguin and Keller Williams came into my studio and played some songs. I knew Keller would like “Scrapple.” He loved the Grateful Dead, and he’s kind of a hippie at heart. That’s what our movie’s about, and those are our fans, so I gave Keller a copy of the DVD; we were always trying to turn musicians on to our movie. About ten days later I got a call from his manager, and he said Keller really loves the movie.

In May of 2008 his manager emailed me a MP3 file that said “Nepalese Temple Balls.” I was surprised and touched that Keller liked our movie enough to write a song using our lines as lyrics. I’m actually getting a writing credit on the record, which is cool for me because now I get to say I’m a songwriter.

R&G: Any royalties involved?

Geoff: Who knows? I’ll tell you in a year. Maybe I’ll get a check for $80 bucks or something [Laughs].

R&G: [Laughs] You and your brother Chris were first-time independent directors, producers, writers and actors. How did you get Taj Mahal on board to score the movie?

Geoff: I was living in Telluride, Colorado and I was writing a music column for the newspaper Sound Advice. In 1991 they announced that Bill Graham was going to do the Midsummer Music Festival, and that’s what really made me decide to stay in Telluride. The paper asked me to be the editor of the magazine that we were going to do for the Festival. I was just a 22-year-old kid. The artists on the line-up were Joe Cocker, the Allman Brothers, Widespread Panic, Blues Traveler, Jackson Brown and Taj Mahal.

The first time I ever met Taj was backstage at the Festival. I was instantly blown away by the guy. I was in a room with him and four other writers, but nobody else knew anything about him. They were just going off what the press release said. I was talking to him about rerecording “Giant Step,” so he got that I was hip to what he was all about and we ended up talking for about 45 minutes. That was the beginning. I was so into him and at that point began collecting all of his music. I was an aspiring filmmaker even then and decided that, wow, wouldn’t it be cool to make a movie with Taj. I had a concert promoting business on the side, and in 1992 I got Taj to come to Telluride and play. I got to know him even better and also got to know his manager at the time, Carey Williams. I asked Carey if I make a movie would Taj do the music for it, and he said, “Sure, if you ever get it done, we’ll do the music.”

Geoff Hanson :: Scrapple

R&G: When did you finish writing the script?

Geoff: We finished it in ’95. Afterwards, Chris and I went to work at the Sundance Film Festival as volunteers because we were trying to absorb as much of the whole independent film thing as we could. We sent the first draft of the “Scrapple” script, which was at the time called “Spam,” to Carey and he gave it to Taj. It didn’t take them long to say they would do the music. The first scene of the script is a guy riding down the highway on a motorcycle with a pig in a sidecar with Taj Mahal singing “Further On Down The Road.” They thought that was cool so we were on. He was critical to the whole thing and we recorded the music with him after we shot the movie, in January of 1997; it was one of the coolest things about the whole project.

R&G: Were you intimidated working with Taj?

Geoff: I don’t think it was intimidating working with him, it was just really exciting. We had just finished our movie and we were doing the music with Taj Mahal. It was a dream come true.

R&G: Tell me something interesting that the general public doesn’t know about him?

Geoff: Well, here’s my favorite thing about Taj. When I first interviewed him in 1991, he said something that is one of the favorite things I’ve ever heard. He said that people are always so preoccupied with other people and what they do and their jobs. Taj said, “I am a job.” I just love that. He’s also a musicologist. He knows more about music than anyone I’ve ever met, and all kinds of music: polyrhythmic, Caribbean and Hawaiian. He’s just a great guy and agreed to do the music for our movie on a handshake.

R&G: Music played an integral role in the film, and you had a diverse range of musicians from Sam Bush to Toots Hibbert.

Geoff: The music in the movie is the narrator. It’s either commenting directly on what’s happening or it’s hitting on a subtext of what’s going on.

R&G: Were there other movies that inspired you to use music as the narrator?

Geoff: “Fandango” used music in the same way. Quentin Tarantino uses music very dramatically, as well. “Scrapple” was right on the heels of “Reservoir Dogs” and “Pulp Fiction.” Our biggest influence was “Easy Rider.” Men’s Journal paid us a huge compliment when they called our movie “the ski bum’s Easy Rider.”

R&G: Do you have any advice for young filmmakers who are trying to score low-budget films with well-known musicians?

Geoff: The first thing would be to go after the deep cuts. Stay away from the really popular stuff because it’s too expensive. But, if you’ve got tastes that are a little bit offbeat, then go for your favorite stuff because most of these people are approachable. The thing is not to come in the front door. Try to figure out a way in the back door. We never would have been able to work with Taj Mahal if we went through the label.



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September 29th, 2008

Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos

Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Black Joe Lewis @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Black Joe Lewis @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Black Joe Lewis @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Patterson Hood of The Drive-By Truckers @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Patterson Hood of The Drive-By Truckers @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Patterson Hood of The Drive-By Truckers @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Patterson Hood of The Drive-By Truckers @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Mike Cooley Of The Drive-By Truckers @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
Mike Cooley Of The Drive-By Truckers @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)
Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits Photos
J. Tillman of The Fleet Foxes @ ACL (Photo Rollo & Grady)



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September 24th, 2008

Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits 2008

Rollo & Grady // Austin City Limits 2008

I will be in Austin this weekend to catch this year’s Austin City Limits Festival. The three day festival celebrates it’s seventh year in existence with performances by Band Of Horses, Raconteurs, Xavier Rudd, Beck, Antibalas, David Byrne, The Kills, The Black Keys and many more.

There are also amazing late night performances held around the city. I plan on catching the Drive-By Truckers at Emo’s Friday night and The Black Keys with The Black Angels on Sunday night at Stubb’s.

Both ACL and Lollapalooza are put on by Austin’s C3 Presents.

I will do my best to update the blog this weekend.



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September 23rd, 2008

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08
Jim James (Photo Rollo & Grady)

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08
Jim James (Photo Rollo & Grady)

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08
Jim James (Photo Rollo & Grady)

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08
Jim James (Photo Rollo & Grady)

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08
Jim James (Photo Rollo & Grady)

My Morning Jacket Pictures // Greek Theatre 9/21/08
Carl Broemel (Photo Rollo & Grady)

Download:
My Morning Jacket – Evil Urges (iTunes)



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September 5th, 2008

Jenny Eliscu :: Contributing Editor – Rolling Stone Magazine

Jenny Eliscu :: Contributing Editor   Rolling Stone Magazine

When I was at this year’s Lollapalooza in Chicago I met Jenny Eliscu.

Jenny has been with Rolling Stone for almost 10 years where she’s gone from a young writer to her current role as one of the magazine’s contributing editors. She’s the author of Schools that Rock: The Rolling Stone College Guide. When she is not writing and traveling to festivals, she hosts Left of Center on Sirius Satellite Radio.

We had a great talk and discussed everything from her coverage of the Napster trial, George Harrison, Amy Winehouse, tequila shots and the current state of music business.

R&G: How did you get your start with Rolling Stone?

Jenny: I started off at a consumer magazine called the CMJ New Music Monthly and after 5 years was looking for anything at a real magazine. I interviewed for a job at Details that I didn’t get because I was supposedly “over-qualified”, which is hardly flattering when you’re like, “No. What do you mean? I’ll take it!”. I remained in contact and became friends with the guy who interviewed me. I didn’t know it at the time, but he had worked for rollingstone.com and when a position opened up he recommended me for it.

R&G: What was his name?

Jenny: Rob Levine. He’s a fantastic dude and responsible for a great deal of my career thus far with that one simple gesture.

R&G: When did you start writing for the magazine?

Jenny:
I had been at rollingstone.com for maybe two weeks when my current editor, Jason Fine, came down and asked me to go to Woodstock ’99 to do a story for the magazine about this doctor who was setting up a psychiatric triage for kids who were tripping on whatever they tripped on in 1999. So I was like, “What? First of all, I’m going to Woodstock ’99? Second of all, I’m writing a story for Rolling Stone Magazine? What the fuck?”

R&G: That’s a major story for your first article.

Jenny: Yeah! Oh my God, totally! I had no idea. I look back now and I know I felt very humbled by the experience, but I don’t think I knew what the hell I was doing. I could do it so much better now; obviously. This entire summer I’m going to festivals, and now it’s stressful since I’m covering them. But I know what I’m doing now. Whereas Woodstock ’99 was a literally trial by fire.

R&G: I’m interested in how technology is disrupting the music business. You covered the Napster trial. Did you or anyone you interview foresee the impact that Peer to Peer Technology (P2P) would have on the music industry today?

Jenny:
Oh no…definitely not. I have to say that when the initial Napster story broke, it had reached a point of being a mainstream issue where everybody was using it. When Metallica and Dr. Dre decided to sue Napster, it was obvious that something big was going to happen that seemed like it would change everything.

R&G: But didn’t it blow your mind at the time? Did you think that the labels, with all the money they had, might be able to get rid of this type of “uprising”?

Jenny: It’s hard to say. I really wish I could look back on that with 20/20 vision. I’m not skirting the issue by being journalistic, but you can’t be too convinced you know what’s going to happen next, or you lose your engagement with the topic. The other thing is that nobody fucking knew what was happening. Every issue, I would do a story on Napster and I would interview experts and various execs in the music business. I was talking to Jimmy Iovine about what this Napster thing was going to do and asking Dr. Dre why he’s suing Napster. Everybody had different ideas. For a while, it was, “It’s going to be the universal jukebox where you can stream any song you ever wanted to hear online in an instant, high quality audio, so why would anyone need to download anything.” Then other people would say, “Oh, it’s all going to be downloaded. Nobody wants to stream. They want it on their hard drive.Then the iPod came out. Nobody saw that coming. Nobody fuckin’ saw that. It came up from behind. All the shit that people postulated would happen, none of it happened, and now Apple rules the music business.

R&G: Do you think Steve Jobs is good for the music industry?

Jenny: Definitely. Steve Jobs is great. Even if he does what he does for purely mercenary reasons, he is just a good capitalist. Shaking things up is better for music. Anybody who comes in and fucks shit up is great for the industry.

R&G: Where do you see the music industry in the next five years?

Jenny:
Well, if I’ve learned anything in covering this stuff, it’s not to make any predictions.

R&G: But make one.

Jenny: Five years ago, the landscape for digital distribution and music was really not that different from what it’s like now, but obviously, five years prior to that it was very different. I think the personal electronic side of things is really in its biggest boom right now. Some “smart” opinions are that wireless companies might start buying/investing in record labels.

R&G: With all these potential business models the consumer ends up losing out on music at some point. It’s going to be tough to get all of your music in one place.

Jenny:
I totally agree with you. That’s bad for music, and when it’s bad for music, consumers respond by not buying as much of what you’re putting out there. It’s almost impossible to transition into any of these potentially viable models until the publishers of songs start loosening their hold on the purse strings a little bit. You can’t have this competition where only this label’s songs are available here on this download site. Give the customers what they want.

R&G: What do you think of music blogs breaking stories “real time” before the magazines can report on them?

Jenny: When well executed, they are a great thing. I do think that, as a writer, clearly the first two things that suffer are writing and reporting in those instances. So you have a lot of false information that people take as true because it’s presumably a news source when it’s not; it’s a blog, and so that is unfortunate. From a Rolling Stone standpoint, that’s not what we do. We offer a more expert and thoroughly written look at the stories we report and think our readers care about most.

R&G: So you guys have to move faster on your deadlines to get the magazine out?

Jenny: We come out every two weeks, so we have very short lead times. In response to the popularity of blogs and even YouTube and stuff like that, we have to reconsider how we cover things like the Video Music Awards because where it falls in our production cycle, it could be old news with all the good jokes made and the insights insighted.

R&G: Which major artists have you interviewed?

Jenny: I’ve had extensive series of interviews with Pete Townsend, and I’ve interviewed George Harrison on the phone once.

R&G: You spoke to George Harrison right before he passed away, correct?

Jenny: Shortly before, yes.

R&G: When you talked to him, did you know he was ill?

Jenny: No, he seemed fine. He had a new record coming out, Brainwashed, which ultimately ended up being his final album, released posthumously. He was promoting it when I spoke to him. There was a buzz of activity around him, which was the only reason I was able to get the interview. I was so nervous; it was like 11:00 in the morning and I’m not much of a drinker, but I had some airplane bottles of tequila and I downed two of them before we spoke.

R&G: Nothing wrong with that. Was there something that you came away with during that conversation that you didn’t expect?

Jenny: It was easier to talk to him than I thought it would be. It all made sense when I got off the phone with him. He knew how to guide the interview. He was very professional. He knew what he wanted to talk about and I knew clearly what he wanted to talk about and I have never been one to take advantage of my access to ask things that I don’t think they’d be prepared to answer. It’s like, George frickin’ Harrison agreed to talk to me. I’d always thought that he’d be an amazing person and he was.

R&G: You’ve interviewed Mariah Carey, Christina Aguilera, Britney Spears, and Amy Winehouse. How did you become the diva interview lady?

Jenny: There are very few women who write for Rolling Stone. There have been times over the years where I have been the go-to if they wanted a woman interviewed by another woman.

R&G: When you are sitting in Mariah Carey’s apartment or wherever the hell you are, do you feel like you’re on Pluto?

Jenny: Yeah, but that’s the fun part. Either you feel like you’re on Pluto – and that’s fun – or you feel like wow, I really don’t feel like I’m on Pluto. Isn’t this interesting? Those three women are all different cases, and I can’t really speak much to Christina Aguilera, but she’s a lot smarter than anyone would expect or give her credit for and I liked her quite a bit. And Britney Spears, I love Britney.

R&G: When you interviewed Amy Winehouse, did you see any hints that she was messed up?

Jenny: There was just an element of drama to her from the “go”. I just had a feeling that this girl was going through some shit. It’s not controversial to acknowledge that Amy Winehouse has some kind of substance abuse problem.

R&G: You saw her at a monumental point in her life that foreshadowed where she is now and how we perceive her through the media…

Jenny: I couldn’t believe it when I met with her the first day in Toronto and they (Winehouse & Blake Civil-Fielder) had this explosive fight. She was hysterical and like a week later in Miami, I was supposed to hang out with her/them that morning and her publicist calls me to say that they needed to reschedule the interview for later. Then I get a call from my office and since we also publish US Weekly someone there tells me, “Oh, did you hear that Amy Winehouse got married?” That was how I heard. I was in the same city as her, waiting to do an interview with her, and found out that she got married.

R&G: Were you pissed that you weren’t a bridesmaid?

Jenny: [Laughs] I was like, “What the fuck? What do you mean she got married?” They postponed my interview so that they could go get married? I was like, when last we met, they were in a big dramatic fight. This is brilliant. You can’t make this shit up. It’s the best when you can’t make the shit up.

R&G: You did a piece on Band of Horses for Rolling Stone’s 2007 Hotlist.

Jenny: Yeah, I did a feature on Band of Horses – who, I think are fantastic – I was not a major fan of their first record, but their most recent [Cease To Begin] – the one I did that story on – I think is an incredible record and I’m kind of surprised that it didn’t do better. I think My Morning Jacket (MMJ) are more skilled but I certainly think that a larger portion of MMJ fans should be Band of Horses fans.

R&G: Do you like MMJ’s new album [Evil Urges]?

Jenny: Totally.

R&G: It’s great when a band takes a risk and tries something new and interesting.

Jenny: I think one of the most salient points about My Morning Jacket is that their success demonstrates that those generalizations about people having bad taste, are not entirely true. You see a band like MMJ playing Madison Square Garden on New Years’ Eve, and especially as a New Yorker, that’s significant; that’s not lost on me. It’s like, “Really? Oh my god!” Not only good for them but good for you guys, buying those tickets. I mean, I think MMJ are amazing and I think they have always said, “We’re not just one kind of band.” They continue to demonstrate that and I appreciate it.

R&G: How about the Strokes, are they going to put out another album?


Jenny
: Yeah! I can’t say exactly when, but I do believe there’s going to be some new Strokes activity early next year.

R&G: Thank you–you’ve been great.

Jenny:
You’re lucky I’m not giving you hell over your Kings of Leon text messages from earlier.

R&G: I am what? Lucky? [Laughs]

Jenny:
You’re lucky I’m not giving you hell over your schlagging the Kings Of Leon.

R&G: Yes, I did schlagged them. I saw them at the The Greek Theatre [Los Angeles] – and they killed it. They are still one of my favorite bands, but it looked like they spent an hour and a half on their hair and the clothes before the show. They’re a southern rock n’ roll band and they have perms and makeup on.

Jenny: First of all, this is rock n’ roll, baby! Would you complain if David Johansen took too long putting on his fucking eyelashes for the New York Dolls? Who cares?

Further Reading:
The Troubled Homecoming Of The Marlboro Marine – Jenny Eliscu



August 29th, 2008

The Big Lebowski :: Dead Flowers

The Big Lebowski :: Dead Flowers

There is a great article in the new issue of Rolling Stone on the 10 year anniversary of The Big Lebowski; “The Decade Of The Dude” written by Sam Jones.

Assistant Editor, Andy Greene, contributes an excellent piece “Inside the Dude’s Stoner Soundtrack”. In the article, music supervisor T-Bone Burnett recounts his troubles in securing the rights to Townes Van Zandt’s cover of the Stones’ “Dead Flowers“.

TOWNES VAN ZANDT

“[Former Stones manager] Allen Klein owns the rights to it,” Burnett says. “He wanted $150,000.” Burnett begged Klein to just come down and watch an early cut of Lebowski. “It got to the part where the Dude says, ‘I hate the fuckin’ Eagles, man!’ Klein stands up and says, ‘That’s it, you can have the song!’ That was beautiful.” For the record, Burnett agrees with the Dude (”[The Eagles] sort of single-handedly destroyed that whole scene that was brewing back then,” he says), but the line infuriated Glenn Frey. “I ran into [Frey] and he gave me some shit,” Jeff Bridges says. “I can’t remember what he said exactly, but my anus tightened a bit.”

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August 14th, 2008

Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures

Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Black Joe Lewis

Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Parker Gispert Of The Whigs

Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Alison Mosshart Of The Kills
Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Alison Mosshart Of The Kills Passing Out
Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Jamie Hence Of The Kills Cranking The Volume Up After Alison Passed Out
Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney Of The Black Keys
Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Patrick Carney Of The Black Keys
Better Late Than Never // Lollapalooza Pictures
Jim Derogatis