October 26th, 2008

Rollo & Grady // Sunday Blues Volume #10

Rollo & Grady // Sunday Blues Volume #10
Otis Rush



October 25th, 2008

David Cross // Doesn’t Like Los Angeles

David Cross // Doesnt Like Los Angeles

David Cross – Phone Call From A Cranky Terrorist

Download:
David Cross – Shut Up, You Fucking Baby (iTunes)
Arrested Development Season 1 (NetFlix)

Rollo & Grady // David Cross – Doesn’t Like Atlanta (Click Here)



October 25th, 2008

Merl Saunders // The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

Merl Saunders // The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
Merl Saunders

Some sad news.

From The SFGate.com:
“Keyboardist Merl Saunders, the gentle lion of the San Francisco music scene best known as co-captain of guitarist Jerry Garcia’s solo excursions outside the Grateful Dead, died Friday at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center after fighting infections.

The 74-year-old musician suffered a debilitating stroke 6 1/2 years ago and, although he lost the ability to speak, he made numerous sentimental guest appearances at shows over those years playing with one hand.

“I never met anybody so happy who had a stroke,” said Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart. “In the end, the only thing that lit him up was the music. Sometimes he’d cry, but I’ve never seen anybody so happy in the realm of music.”

The native San Franciscan attended Polytechnic High School with singer Johnny Mathis.

After serving in the Army from 1953 to 1957, he played jazz organ on the same circuit as Jimmy Smith and Brother Jack McDuff. He worked as musical director of the Billy Williams Revue and served in a similar capacity in Oscar Brown Jr.’s off-Broadway show “Big Time Buck White.” He backed up Dinah Washington and jammed with Miles Davis. Mr. Saunders, who was rarely seen in public without his trademark aviator shades and black leather fisherman’s cap, started playing with Garcia in 1971 at a small Fillmore Street nightclub called the Matrix, where the Grateful Dead guitarist liked to hold informal jam sessions on Dead nights off. Within months, the loose-knit band was playing to packed houses at small local clubs like the Keystone Korner in North Beach every weekend the Dead wasn’t working. Members sometimes included former Creedence Clearwater rhythm guitarist Tom Fogerty and former Journey rhythm guitarist George Tickner.
Merl Saunders // The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down



October 25th, 2008

Rollo & Grady // Saturday Soul Volume #4

Rollo & Grady // Saturday Soul Volume #4
Sly Stone



October 24th, 2008

Interview With Parker Gispert Of The Whigs

Interview With Parker Gispert Of The Whigs

The first time I saw The Whigs frontman Parker Gispert was last year prior to a gig at Spaceland. He looked very intense and little bit shy, but that all changed when he hit the stage. He was like a man possessed, jumping up and down, thrashing his guitar and growling out vocals reminiscent of Kurt Cobain and Paul Westerberg.

When I met him last month at Avalon Hollywood, he and his bandmates [Drummer Julian Dorio and bassist Tim Deaux] had been stuck in rush hour traffic on the I-10 and were late for soundcheck (recurring R&G theme). I was expecting a hurried, five-minute interview. To my surprise, it was the exact opposite. Parker was laid-back and generous with his time.

The Whigs are one of the hardest working bands out today. They play with such high-level energy and enthusiasm you would think they were playing either their first or last show, a style similar to the Avett Brothers. They open for the Kooks this Tuesday at The Palladium (Buy Tix), marking their their fourth visit to Los Angeles in less than a year.

R&G: It’s been well-documented that you guys recorded your first album in a fraternity house with equipment that you bought from eBay and then resold for a profit after the recording sessions were over. Tell me about the experience of self-producing your album “Give 'Em All a Big Fat Lip”.

Parker: I think it was the logical thing to do, considering it was our first record and we knew what we wanted the songs to sound like. It gave us the opportunity to create a record without interference from anybody. We actually thought that it was a pretty amazing thing that we could have a dream recording studio for free with any equipment we wanted and we weren’t on the clock.

R&G: Were there any industry people in Athens [Georgia] interested in signing you?

Interview With Parker Gispert Of The Whigs

Parker: Not really. There wasn’t a ton of interest. We had a small run-in with a label that turned sour quickly and we were kind of reeling from that. To be honest with you, we weren’t looking.

R&G: You guys formed in 2002. Why did you wait until 2005 to record “Give ‘Em All A Big Fat Lip?”

Parker:
Well, for starters we were in school. It was important for all of us to graduate. We didn’t want to put out a record and not tour behind it. We wanted to wait until we could give it the proper treatment. We looked at it as a blessing. It gave us more time to write songs. There easily could have been a couple albums in there.

R&G: In 2006 Rolling Stone magazine named The Whigs the best unsigned band in America. What was your reaction to the news?

Parker:
I remember I was about to take a quiz and Josh, our manager, called me and told me about the article. You have to realize, at that time we had recorded and put the album out ourselves. To be in Rolling Stone was strange, but it felt good. It was a nice compliment from the writer. We didn’t let it go to our heads. It was just one article.

R&G: How did you get on their radar?

Parker: We were lucky. We were playing shows up in New York while we were in school. We had Tuesday/Thursday class, so we’d tour Thursday, Friday, and Saturday out of town. The New York shows we would do during the week – drive up and then drive back. During one of our trips there was a Rolling Stone journalist at the show and he was impressed.

R&G: It wasn’t long after the Rolling Stone piece that the labels came knocking on your door. Why did you choose ATO Records [Dave Matthews' Label]?

Parker: The guy who signed us was named Jonathan Eshak. He saw us play at Pianos in New York a couple of times and he liked our music. The other labels we met with were like “We love the band. The band’s great. So let’s re-record the album and change the songs around,” and that didn’t really make sense to us. ATO was the only label that came to us and was like, “Hey, we love what you’re doing, so we just want to re-release the first album and we like all the new songs you’re writing. Let’s talk about making another record.” That was exciting.

R&G: In January you released your second album “Mission Control.” Shortly after the release you guys played on the Letterman show. He loved your performance. He growled “Yeah” and then said, “Nice Going. God, that was cool. Good to see you. Thank you very much. Power trio, Paul?” And Paul responds, “Love it.” How did that make you feel?

Parker: It was awesome. We played in Athens on Saturday night and then had to load up our gear at 5 a.m. Monday. It’s just the three of us, so we got in the van, drove straight there, got in at 2 p.m., and slept for a couple hours. We headed over to the show to load in our gear at 5 p.m. It was all such a blur because we were so tired and you get on the stage and it’s freezing in there. I don’t know if you’ve heard, apparently it keeps the audience lively. Also, the stage was so close to Dave’s desk. I thought it was weird. The lights go down, you’re playing, and there’s a silhouette of a man six feet to your left. He’s sitting at the desk and its like, “Whoa, Dave Letterman is right next to me.” The guys in the band were really cool to us. They played “Gimme Shelter” by the Rolling Stones during the commercial break and that got us all excited.

R&G: Were you nervous before your performance?

Parker: I was scared because I didn’t know how it was going to come off. There are some –intangibles – the guy doing sound for the show, the lights; there’s any number of things that are outside of your control. We actually went back to our hotel to watch it and the cable didn’t work, which sucked, so we sprinted down the street and went into this bar and the guy turned it on for us, which was a little embarrassing. We watched it and we were like, “Oh wow! We did good!”
Interview With Parker Gispert Of The Whigs



October 24th, 2008

Jane’s Addiction // Porno For Pyros

Janes Addiction // Porno For Pyros
Perry Farrell @ 2008 Lollapalooza (Photo Rollo & Grady)

Jane’s Addiction
played in Los Angeles last night with the original lineup of Perry Farrell, guitarist Dave Navarro, bassist Eric Avery and drummer Stephen Perkins. I’ve been unable to find the setlist or a review of the show. I didn’t have an opportunity to see them in the late 80’s early 90’s, but I imagine they still sound good. Though I would prefer my seats to be side opposite from where Dave Navarro is playing. I bet he was a lot cooler back in the day.

Farrell told Altitude in August that “there’s as much likelihood [of a Jane's Addiction reunion] as there being commercial space flight,” He went on to say that NME Awards show in April was like “having a girlfriend that you have always been in love with and you’ll always be in love with, but you don’t quite get along with. You’re still in love with her and every time you get together, you end up throwing food at each other.”



October 24th, 2008

Wilco // I Am Not Willing (with Syd Straw)

Wilco // I Am Not Willing (with Syd Straw)


*From 1995 Box Full of Letters EP:

1. Box Full Of Letters (3:06)
2. I Am Not Willing (3:54)
3. Casino Queen (live) (2:54)
4. Who Were You Thinkin’ Of (live) (2:36)

Download:
Wilco – A.M. (iTunes)



October 24th, 2008

Rollo & Grady Jive-Five // Volume #15

Rollo & Grady Jive Five // Volume #15
Rollo & Grady Jive Five // Volume #15
Galactic

No Hip-Hop today for the Jive-Five. All of the bands below have dabbled or still dabble in hip-hop. I purchased tickets today for the Medeski, Martin & Wood show @ The El Rey Theatre. I will most likely check out Galactic, but I don’t care for The HOB.

Galactic @ The House Of Blues Sunset Wednesday November 12th (Buy Tix)

Medeski Martin & Wood @ El Rey Theatre Friday, November 21st (Buy Tix)

For New Yorkers. I highly recommended the New Mastersounds. They are playing @ Sullivan Hall on Friday, November 17th and Saturday, November 18th (Buy Tix)

Download:
Medeski Martin & Wood – Let's Go Everywhere (iTunes)
The New Mastersounds – 102% (iTuneS)
Soulive – Turn It Out (iTunes)
Galactic – Vintage Reserve (iTunes)
The Poets of Rhythm – Discern / Define (iTunes)



October 22nd, 2008

Rage Against The Machine // Killing In The Name

Rage Against The Machine // Killing In The Name

Ok, enough with the acoustic sensitive folk stuff. According to Song Facts, Killing In The Name’s lyrics “Some of those who wear forces are the same that burn crosses” imply that some members of the US police force were, and possibly still are, members of the Ku Klux Klan. Rock on Rage.